nprmusic:

Watch Boy George and Black Lips cover T. Rex’s “Bang a Gong (Get It On)” live at WXPN because why not. 

The New and Improved SAT


newyorker:

image

In light of the College Board’s recent changes to the SAT, some humorous alternative vocabulary questions: http://nyr.kr/RpVqeO

Directions: Match the italicized slanty word or phrase with its meaning.

1. Mike, like, likes Emily, but not like that. The best meaning of “like” is:

a) you know
b) um
c) similar to
d) derives pleasure from
e) lolz

Photograph by Thomas Barwick.

(Source: newyorker.com)

(Source: beca)

behindbobsburgers:

Tina is a Punk Rocker. [full color version] (via ajmartinsson)

behindbobsburgers:

Tina is a Punk Rocker. [full color version] (via ajmartinsson)

(via chrstphrwng)

thisiselliz:

itsreal.gif

thisiselliz:

itsreal.gif

(via chrstphrwng)

alittlebitgayandmore:

Shang’s journey to self discovery as told by me

(via pajamaralls)

coelasquid:

werewolf1992:

whiteboyfriend:

NPR posted an article with a title asking why people don’t read anymore, but the content was just an April Fools joke. Then people started to embarrass themselves.

(gawker)

This is brilliant

I wish I could say I was surprised.

(via chrstphrwng)

humansofnewyork:

"I’m having trouble dealing with society.""What aspect of society?""The whole thing."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m having trouble dealing with society."
"What aspect of society?"
"The whole thing."

shelbysbutt:

forever-spoopydragon:

edwardspoonhands:

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?
More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.(Source)

Whhaaaaat?

wooooowww

i wish id done a different thing with my life sometimes

shelbysbutt:

forever-spoopydragon:

edwardspoonhands:

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?

More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.

The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.

Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.

Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.

The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. 

This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.

This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.


(Source)

Whhaaaaat?

wooooowww

i wish id done a different thing with my life sometimes

(via chrstphrwng)

newyorker:

In a Senate Finance Committee hearing, a top economic adviser for George W. Bush argued that “the main cause of inequality is Americans who choose not to work.” George Packer, who also testified, weighs in: http://nyr.kr/1l1bH3o

“It doesn’t require decades of work by a leading economist to understand that there’s a connection between wealth and power. It should be clear … that hard work no longer keeps millions of Americans out of poverty.”

Photograph by Pete Marovich/Bloomberg/Getty.

newyorker:

In a Senate Finance Committee hearing, a top economic adviser for George W. Bush argued that “the main cause of inequality is Americans who choose not to work.” George Packer, who also testified, weighs in: http://nyr.kr/1l1bH3o

“It doesn’t require decades of work by a leading economist to understand that there’s a connection between wealth and power. It should be clear … that hard work no longer keeps millions of Americans out of poverty.”

Photograph by Pete Marovich/Bloomberg/Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com)